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Sam P. Most, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Academic Appointments

  • Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

Key Documents

Contact Information

  • Clinical Offices
    Stanford ENT 801 Welch Rd MC 5739 Stanford, CA 94305
    Tel Work (650) 736-3223 Fax (650) 725-6685
  • Academic Offices
    Alternate Contact
    Samantha Stone Academic Office Administrative Assistant Tel Work 6504985615
    Not for medical emergencies or patient use

Professional Overview

Clinical Focus

  • Facial Plastic Surgery
  • Facial reconstructive surgery
  • Facial aesthetic surgery
  • Rhinoplasty
  • Facelift
  • Blepharoplasty
View All 13clinical focus of Sam Most

Academic Appointments

Administrative Appointments

  • Medical Director, Multidisciplinary Cosmetic Surgery Center, University of Washington Medical Center (2004 - 2006)
  • Division Chief, Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine (2002 - 2006)
  • Division Chief, Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine (2006 - present)
  • Faculty senate, Stanford University School of Medicine (2011 - 2013)

Honors and Awards

  • Clinician Teacher of the Year, Department of Otolaryngology-HNS, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (2003)
  • Ben Shuster Award, American Academy of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (2003)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations

  • Editorial Board, JAMA-Facial Plastic Surgery (2007 - present)
  • Fellow Member, American Academy of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (2006 - present)
  • Fellowship Director, American Academy of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (2006 - present)
  • Board Member, American Academy of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (2009 - present)

Professional Education

Fellowship: University of Washington Medical Center WA (2002)
Residency: University of Washington Medical Center WA (2001)
Board Certification: Otolaryngology, American Board of Otolaryngology (2002)
Internship: Yale - New Haven Hospital CT (1996)
Medical Education: Stanford University School of Medicine CA (1995)
M.D.: Stanford University, Medicine (1995)
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Courses

2013-14

Scientific Focus

Current Research and Scholarly Interests

Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery-Research Program Summary

Evidence-based medicine in Facial Plastic Surgery
The primary goal of this research program is to develop a higher standard of care for facial plastic surgery patients. The approach to this goal is two-fold. The first involves development of prospective studies that examine the efficacy of new or existing surgical techniques in facial plastic surgery. One clinical problem we have already begun to examine is nasal obstruction. Functional rhinoplasty techniques have been a mainstay of otolaryngology, and facial plastic surgery in particular, for decades. While many have attempted, with mixed success, to examine nasal function using quantitative measures, few prospective studies of quality of life have been performed. To this end, we have begun to examine prospectively various functional rhinoplasty techniques.

The second approach to development of a higher standard of care for our patients is the testing of various over-the-counter ‘cosmeceutical’ products. Generally, products that are touted as effective by industry have little or no clinical evidence to back up said claims. Two of these studies have been completed and have resulted in remarkable response from industry as well as the media. More importantly, these types of studies provide valuable information about product efficacy to physicians and patients alike.

Facial Nerve Recovery after Injury
Facial nerve injury after trauma or extirpative surgery can be devastating to patients. The Division seeks to develop a clinical and basic research program studying facial nerve recovery after such injuries. The basic research program within the Division will use a previously developed animal (mouse) model for facial nerve injury to examine the age-dependence of motor neuron survival in the facial nucleus and its correlation to facial nerve recovery. Furthermore, the role of apoptotic cell death in the facial nerve nucleus will be studied, with the hope that anti-apoptotic processes may aid in facial nerve recovery. The clinical research program will study quality of life issues in facial nerve injury patients.

Publications

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Publication Topics

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